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20121222
20121230
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KRCB (PBS) 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 11:30am PST
sense your environment and act on your environment. >> classified as a rare disease cmt affects 1-2500 people in the u.s. generally speaking a disease as rare if it afflicts fewer than 200,000 people. many of these diseases are genetic. but in truth, there's nothing rare about rare diseases. >> conditions like for instance, hearing loss or deafness, there's many genes that can -- in which mutati can lead to hearing impairment. but in one specific family an individual single gene will be responsible. so in the mixture of the phenotype of how many people can have hearing impairment it's not as rare as people think it is. the same goes for conditions like developmental delay or even birth defects. 2-3% of all children are born with a major birth defect no matter where you do the studies around the world and that is a significant% of the population. they have different kinds of birth defects and the individual birth defect might be considered a rare defect like the general heart defect or kidney defect. but actually there is many children that are born with birth defects. >> here in the u.
PBS
Dec 22, 2012 11:30am PST
encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genec foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, gun control in america following the newtown, connecticut massacre. then, a look back at 2012 and ahead to the new year. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. not feeling too well but still standing. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, more guns or fewer guns? gun control advocates hope to see a federal ban reinstated on assault weapons following the unspeakable massacre of 20 children and six adults last week in connecticut. but gun advocates are pitching new state laws that allow teachers to carry concealed weapons to school, and one state, virginia, is considering a bill to require teachers to carry weapons to work. president obama promised to make gun control a central issue for his next term. vice president joe biden is leading the administration ef
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 10:00pm PST
. >> sectarian groups are always in tension with their environment. that tension is manifested in a tendency to want to spread the message out, to hit the road and convince others at t tru is real. >> ( dramatized ): go nowhere among the gentiles and enter no town of the samaritans, but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of israel. >> one of the characteristics of the roman empire is, there is suddenly great freedom of movement, more so than in any period before that. and in some ways, more free than any period that will happen again, until the invention of the steamship. >> ( dramatized ): as you go, proclaim the kingdom of heaven has come near. >> one would have encountered on... on the via egnatia or... or any other major roman road, a wonderful variety of journeyers. some would be certainly engaged in commerce, taking their commercial products from... from place to place. some would be involved in goods and services, taking their particular services to different places. one would have found philosophers. rpe found persons such as paul-- preachers, missionaries of particula
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 9:00am PST
environment in which age is stereotyped, right? >> yes. >> then you will conform willy-nilly to that stereotype, if you're supposed to be fragile at the age 80. >> yes. >> then you become fragile. >> exactly. >> if you think, however, that your's going to be living to the age 100, then you shatter the stereotype and you don't conform to it, and you're healthier? >> you are. >> you actuallyffect your health? >> you affect your health by your attitude. donald palmer has the oldest thing in the world that we are as a result of what we think. >> this is all the brain? >> of course. >> all a result of cognition. >> cognition, that's right. cognition is just a $10 word for thinking and all the aspects of thinking. >> can i use $10 words on this? >> yes. >> now, you know that nih, national institutes for health or of health. >> national institutes of metal. >> they -- of health. >> they just had within summary past couple of weeks they had a big meeting and they talked about how your mental state actually affects your physical health, correct? >> yes. >> were you there? >> i wasn't at that
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 12:30pm PST
environment, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attack which took place that night. >> will former republican senator chuck kagel and make it to the pentagon? >> the house did not take up the tax measure today because it did on have suffient support from our members to pass. house speaker john boehner's statement thursday evening as he stood in print of the republican conference, he recited the serenity prayer. god, grant me theereny to acpt the tngs which i cannot change and close the house for business until after christmas. there is no place like an empty house for the holidays. thus diane john boehner's plan b, which was destined to die anyway. >> let me be clear. speaker boehner's plans are nonstarters in the senate. >> boehner appeared friday morning and said, if this thing were easy, it would have been done decades ago. >> i am interested in solving the major problems that face our country. that means house leaders, senate leaders, and the president, are going to have to continue to work together to address those concerns. >> the president lifted his number t
PBS
Dec 30, 2012 8:30am PST
? believing that you have the ability to control something of the environment around choice. >> yes. and, you know, i don't want to confuse people when i say... on the one hand i'm saying, "look, too much choice is bad," on the other hand i'm saying, "you'd better see your life in terms of choice." and what i mean there is that what's most important is the belief that you have control. and what gives you that belief is by having choice that you can understand, that you can take control over. if you have choices that you don't understand, that you don't know how to deal with, that actually makes you feel less in control. so what's key here is the feeling of control. >> so how can we learn, sheena, to become effective choosers? >> i recently wrote an afterword for my book to give people tips on how they can become more effective at using some of the things i talked about in the book. so if i would say there was one thing you had to choose in order to become a more effective chooser, that's to become more choo about choice, about when you make a choice. so... >> hinojosa: about when. >> abo
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 9:00pm PST
suggest is that jesus was quite proximate to a thriving and sophisticated urban environment that would have brought with it all of the diversity of... of the roman empire, and would have required, just to get on, you know, as the price of doing business, a level of sophistication that one would not have thought characteristic of jesus, the humble carpenter. >> narrato scholars today question the image of jesus the humble carpenter, and disagree about his social class. >> ( dramatized ): they were astounded, and said "where did this man get this wisdom? is not this the carpenter's son?" >> the difficulty for us in hearing a term like "carpenter" is that we immediately think of a highly skilled worker, and, at least in north america, in the middle class, making a very high income. as soon as we take that into the ancient world, we are totally lost, because, first of all, there was no middle class in the ancient world. there were the "haves" and the "have nots," to put it very simply. and in the anthropology of peasant societies, to say that somebody is an artisan or a carpenter is
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 5:30pm PST
his second. she's been the president's point person on the environment for four years, but today, lisa jackson announced she's stepping down as administrator of the environmental protection agency. in a statement, jackson said, "i will leave the e.p.a. confident the ship is sailing in the right direction." jackson's tenure was defined in part by efforts to curb carbon emissions. in 2009, she formally declared greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, a threat to public health. that same day, she spoke on "the newshour." >> i join the president in llg for ean ergy and climate legislation. and that's because i think having economy-wide legislation sends an unequivocal signal to the private sector that we really mean it, that we're moving towards green energy. >> brown: but a bill to cap greenhouse gases foundered in the democratic-controlled senate and never made it to the president's desk. jackson also pushed a rule to reduce smog, but it faced bitter opposition from republicans and industry over the cost and potential effect on jobs, and last year, president obama ordered it wi
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 5:30pm PST
stable environments to attract the foreign investments, yes. we will work together. we will produce. we exert more efforts in order to develop, in order to find the solution for our economical crisis. >> warner: waleed el haddad, thank you for joining us. you can watch all of our monday interview with opposition leader mohammed el-baradei. find a link on our home page. >> ifill: now, a second look at a science story that captured headlines this year. the federal government has taken new steps to limit some of the research it does with chimpanzees, which have long been the source of hope and debate. but questions remain about whether those experiments should occur under any circumstances. "newshour" science correspondent miles o'brien reports. >> reporter: there are no other animals quite like them, except us. they share 99% of our d.n.a. and it shows. they scheme, plot and fight. they care for their babies and they grieve their dead. and they love a good game of catch. as i discovered, queenie had little patience for my wild pitches. >> did you see her stomp her foot? >> reporter: she's
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm PST
sense of what was going on. >> a sense of acceptance, of the environment and i think of andy's work in that way, of his experience. we're both from pennsylvania so i alws --ee sense of that. but, you know, when i think of the work, again, it's a complete kind of externalization and of playing very god like situation. playing the creator of -- you can multiply, you can procreate image after image and at the same time you can have aspects of how we interpret images of perfection, defined images into abstraction of life and death. so they're so rich, the whole aspect of what it means to be alive and a sense of our parameters that might take place in drama in this work. >> rose: this is? >> well, this is disaster painting. warhol did a number of these orange disaster and it's an electric chair. in 1963 he was preparing for an exhibition in paris and he said "i'm going to call this show "death in america." but the image of death, the electric chair, is made kind of pretty in these electric chairs but i think there's so much conflict or complexity to the prettiness of warhol's banality. i
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)